Shirley Temple died…. Along with my childhood :/

Shirley Temple, who as a dimpled, precocious and determined little girl in the 1930s sang and tap-danced her way to a height of Hollywood stardom and worldwide fame that no other child has reached, or could ever, died on Monday night at her home in Woodside, Calif. She was 85.

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As a child I absolutely loved Shirley Temple. I remember watching every single movie with my grandma. We loved any and all musicals. She was my favorite!! And my favorite http://youtu.be/wNwFXLcrsbc We would go to the country club. My grandma plays golf and in Yerington there used to be a golf course. I would go with her not while she played golf but just go to the bar and I would have Shirley Temples. I would walk in the bar and they would make one. (See even when I was. Lil girl, I’d walk into a bar and they knew what I wanted and made it right away… Haha… I guess that’s a whole different blog… Haha) I would always have a Shirley Temple waiting for me :)

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Sorta like my childhood has died :/ I know every single movie was made wayyyyy before my childhood but…. She was a big part of my childhood. If that makes any sense haha…

From 1935 to 1939 she was the most popular movie star in America, with Clark Gable a distant second. She received more mail than Greta Garbo and was photographed more often than President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
At age 3 in 1831, he mother enrolled her in Meglin’s Dance School in Los Angeles. About this time, Temple’s mother began styling her daughter’s hair in ringlets similar to those of silent film star Mary Pickford. It was once guessed the little girl had 56 perfect blonde ringlets.

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In 1932, She was spotted by an agent from Educational Pictures and chosen to appear in “Baby Burlesks,” a series of sexually suggestive one-reel shorts in which children played all the roles. The 4- and 5-year-old children wore fancy adult costumes that ended at the waist.

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“Baby Burlesks” was followed by five two-reel comedies and a year of casting calls and bit-part auditions, which garnered young Shirley half a dozen small roles. By Thanksgiving 1933 she was growing older. She was 5½, and in the previous two years she had earned a total of $702.50. Her mother did the sensible thing: she shaved a year off her daughter’s age. Shirley would be shocked to discover, at a party for her 12th birthday in April 1941, that she was actually 13. Shortly after she signed with Fox in 1934; her birth year was advanced from 1928 to 1929. Even her baby book was revised to support the 1929 date. She admitted her real age when she was 21.
By the time she was 12yr or ahh 13yr she did 40 films. When she turned from a magical child into a teenager, audience interest slackened, and she retired from the screen at 22.
On March 14, 1935, Temple left her footprints and handprints in the wet cement at the forecourt of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood.

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On February 8, 1960, she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her work in films.

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2005 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

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She was married twice. The first marriage was just at the age of 17yrs and lasted 4yrs. She did have 1 child with her first husband. And just a month after after her divorce she met her second husband and 12 days later they were married. She had 2 more children and they stayed married until his death in 2005. They were married 54yrs when he pasted.

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Shirley Temple was easily the most popular and famous child star of all time. She got her start in the movies at the age of three and soon progressed to super stardom. Shirley could do it all: act, sing and dance and all at the age of five!

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